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June 26, 2014 10 comments

The Making of The Cambium

Saddles, Bags, Etc. Uncategorized Heritage Art & Design
By Oliver
The Making of The Cambium
[caption id="attachment_13058" align="alignnone" width="640" caption="A clutch of Cambium"][/caption] Here at Brooks England, we could never have predicted the overwhelming reception our new Cambium range has received.  Setting out to honour the legacy of our founder J.B.Brooks through an innovative new saddle led us to a series of new manufacturing processes that we wanted to share with you. [caption id="" align="alignnone" width="640" caption="Cutting innovations"][/caption] The Cambium is created from a vulcanised rubber that helps mimic the comfort of a broken in leather saddle.  Using this material requires many new processes for Brooks, which has required us to carry out the manufacture in Italy.  Creating the saddle in an Italian factory was not a decision we were prepared to take lightly.  It was imperative to us that the manufacture of the Cambium respected our long standing tradition of craftsmanship to allow it to feel at home amongst the rest of our range. [caption id="attachment_13020" align="alignnone" width="640" caption="If you're not thick enough you're not coming in"][/caption] The rubber used in the Cambium range is not your standard rubber but a blended compound.  It takes a skilled craftsman and technician to blend the rubber using large rollers to create just the right compound for the saddles.  It is a highly technical process that requires passing the large sheets of rubber repeatedly through the rollers.  One mistake can ruin an entire run of saddles. [caption id="" align="alignnone" width="640" caption="Keep on rolling"][/caption] Once the rubber sheets are ready, the saddle tops are cut, using similar tools to those found back home in Smethwick, but sadly unlike the excess leather that is cut off and used for mud flaps and other accoutrements, this rubber is surplus to requirements. Once the rubber is cut, it is ready to meet the cotton that will sit atop of it.  Cut to the same shape, the cotton is placed on top of the rubber and together they are placed in a mould and vulcanised together. Once affixed the top of the Cambium is then shaped before being ready to be attached to the tubular steel frame, in a process that is carried out by hand.  Once this is finished the saddle goes through an inspection process before being boxed up and ready to despatch round the world to a soon to be happy customer. [caption id="attachment_13048" align="alignnone" width="640" caption="We might have some new colours up our sleeve"][/caption]
Comments
I think honey would be a good colour, also red :)
Stephen May 23, 2016 at 4:57 PM
I bought a Cambium C17 saddle last week and i love it. The saddle was comfortable from the first ride and compares favourably to by B17. I loved the photos and descriptions of the manufacturing process, it leads one to appreciate even more (if that's possible) the sheer quality of Brooks products, and the expertise involved in the manufacture of this great saddle.
T.P. Whitworth May 23, 2016 at 4:57 PM
I bought a Cambium C17 saddle last week and i love it. The saddle was comfortable from the first ride and compares favourably to my B17. I loved the photos and descriptions of the manufacturing process, it leads one to appreciate even more (if that's possible) the sheer quality of Brooks products, and the expertise involved in the manufacture of this great saddle.
T.P. Whitworth May 23, 2016 at 4:57 PM
i will be riding the continental divide soon, and planning to ride down to south america, and would like to be a tester on one of your new cut out Cambium seats(hole in it for my soft parts)..how does one get to do that?
Adam Rodriguez May 23, 2016 at 4:57 PM
Unfortunately all the testing for this product is complete
Oliver May 23, 2016 at 4:57 PM
When will we see the Cambium C17 Carved?
Woody May 23, 2016 at 4:57 PM
It is available online now
Oliver May 23, 2016 at 4:57 PM
Would love to see a true black colour, please. BTW, it is an absolutely fabulous saddle the C17 is. Congratulations on your diligence and success!
Bill Stekl May 23, 2016 at 4:57 PM
Regarding seat tops/facings for the C17 & C17 Carved, linen releases moisture faster and better than cotton and silk is not only stronger than steel by weight, but loves analine dye. There are an assortment of ways to blend, structure and weaver these two materials that would provide deep, rich color-fast colors, improved durability and rich, yet comfortable surface textures!
Name (required) May 23, 2016 at 4:57 PM
Regarding the seat tops on the C17 & C17 Carved, linen releases moisture faster and better than cotton and silk is not only stronger than steel by weight, but loves analine dye. There are an assortment of ways to blend, structure and weaver these two materials that would provide deep, rich color-fast colors, improved durability and rich, yet comfortable surface textures, if desired!
Andre May 23, 2016 at 4:57 PM