Flyer S

£ 92
Flyer S

Availability: In stock

Made in England

The Flyer and its ladies model Flyer S are classically sprung saddles for long distance trekking and touring. It is directly descending from the B66 Champion, first featured in the 1927 catalogue. Sharing the same leather tops of the B17 models, they combine the comfort of these popular models with the extra suspension granted by two rear springs. Both are available with tubular steel rivets or with hand hammered copper rivets under the names of Flyer Special and Flyer S Special.

£ 92
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Description

The Flyer and its ladies model Flyer S are classically sprung saddles for long distance trekking and touring. It is directly descending from the B66 Champion, first featured in the 1927 catalogue. Sharing the same leather tops of the B17 models, they combine the comfort of these popular models with the extra suspension granted by two rear springs. Both are available with tubular steel rivets or with hand hammered copper rivets under the names of Flyer Special and Flyer S Special.

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Technical Information

  • Length : 242mm
  • Width : 176 mm
  • Height : 86mm
  • Weight : 800g
  • Frame : Steel
Customer Comments
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Unsolicited testimonials Unfiltered criticism

Unsolicited testimonials

Part of an old Brooks Tradition
31/05/2009
Written by Sue Dodson
Flyer S
I ordered a Flyer S and was wondering whether I'd try to put vent holes in it like those in my B17S. When I received my Flyer S I was quite surprised that it already had vent holes in it. Every place I've read anything about the Flyer S stated that it didn't have vent holes. I'm quite pleased not to have to make them myself.

Is my new saddle an irregular? Is it new that the Flyer S comes with vent holes?

Thanks for making such great saddles. I have 2 B67S, 1 B17S and a Champion Flyer S.
4 of 5 people found this useful
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05/12/2011
Written by Andries Hofstra
Flyer S
Last summer I was preparing my first cycle holiday camping trip.

And I rebuild a MTB frame for this.

I acquired this saddle cheaply from a friend who worked at a local bike shop.

Although “slightly” used...a couple of thousand miles it still looked good.

We had the same body type and length 1.80 mtr so I took a chance.

The first week of the trip the weather took a turn for the worse.

The load I was hauling on the bike and the BOB yak was way too much.

All the while I was still breaking in the saddle.

But the leather “Breathes” and keeps cooler.

In the second week of riding I finally found a bike shop that had proof ride grease from Brooks.

After that there was no problem at all anymore.

Don’t be cheap with that stuff at first.

The saddle quickly became better adjusted after that.

I credit this saddle for helping me complete my first trip.

It made me think different about this critical part of my Cycle

And brooks saddles will be part my future projects
1 of 1 people found this useful
Was this comment helpful to you?
05/12/2011
Written by Andries Hofstra
Flyer S
Last summer I was preparing my first cycle holiday camping trip.

And I rebuild a MTB frame for this.

I acquired this saddle cheaply from a friend who worked at a local bike shop.

Although “slightly” used...a couple of thousand miles it still looked good.

We had the same body type and length 1.80 mtr so I took a chance.

The first week of the trip the weather took a turn for the worse.

The load I was hauling on the bike and the BOB yak was way too much.

All the while I was still breaking in the saddle.

But the leather “Breathes” and keeps cooler.

In the second week of riding I finally found a bike shop that had proof ride grease from Brooks.

After that there was no problem at all anymore.

Don’t be cheap with that stuff at first.

The saddle quickly became better adjusted after that.

I credit this saddle for helping me complete my first trip.

It made me think different about this critical part of my Cycle

And brooks saddles will be part my future projects
1 of 1 people found this useful
Was this comment helpful to you?
31/05/2009
Written by Sue Dodson
Flyer S
I ordered a Flyer S and was wondering whether I'd try to put vent holes in it like those in my B17S. When I received my Flyer S I was quite surprised that it already had vent holes in it. Every place I've read anything about the Flyer S stated that it didn't have vent holes. I'm quite pleased not to have to make them myself.

Is my new saddle an irregular? Is it new that the Flyer S comes with vent holes?

Thanks for making such great saddles. I have 2 B67S, 1 B17S and a Champion Flyer S.
4 of 5 people found this useful
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Unfiltered criticism

We accept all constructive criticism
06/01/2013
Written by Bill Curtin
Flyer S
Do you find many men riding the S model? I'm planning a longer tour and am not very familiar with cycling. The S model just "looks" more comfortable to me with the wider seat. Yet I imagine after more than a century there's a reason you've designed the men's and women's versions differently. Can you explain why? What would be the pros and cons for a man using a women's saddle?
> Some men do prefer to use the S model, though among other reasons we would recommend that for most men the saddle is simply not long enough for comfort.
4 of 4 people found this useful
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26/03/2015
Written by Ahmad Syahid
Flyer S
Based on past experience with the B17 (very much loved), I was wagering that the Flyer would be better for long distance comfort with all the fancy springs & everything. How wrong I was...

After near a couple hundred miles of breaking-in, I have found no comfort from the Flyer despite it now wearing the telltale indentations of my bum

This model (or this particular saddle) also came poorly tensioned out of the box, swiftly fixed with the supplied spanner

The springs also seem ineffectual, probably for a lighter rider (52kg myself), in damping both small & big bumps I face on my commute (yet to tour on this saddle)



Disclaimer: This discomfort is no fault of the bike - I ride a Genesis CdF & found the stock saddle adequate. I was hoping for an *increase* in comfort from a Brooks rather than the opposite
1 of 1 people found this useful
Was this comment helpful to you?
26/03/2015
Written by Ahmad Syahid
Flyer S
Based on past experience with the B17 (very much loved), I was wagering that the Flyer would be better for long distance comfort with all the fancy springs & everything. How wrong I was...

After near a couple hundred miles of breaking-in, I have found no comfort from the Flyer despite it now wearing the telltale indentations of my bum

This model (or this particular saddle) also came poorly tensioned out of the box, swiftly fixed with the supplied spanner

The springs also seem ineffectual, probably for a lighter rider (52kg myself), in damping both small & big bumps I face on my commute (yet to tour on this saddle)



Disclaimer: This discomfort is no fault of the bike - I ride a Genesis CdF & found the stock saddle adequate. I was hoping for an *increase* in comfort from a Brooks rather than the opposite
1 of 1 people found this useful
Was this comment helpful to you?
06/01/2013
Written by Bill Curtin
Flyer S
Do you find many men riding the S model? I'm planning a longer tour and am not very familiar with cycling. The S model just "looks" more comfortable to me with the wider seat. Yet I imagine after more than a century there's a reason you've designed the men's and women's versions differently. Can you explain why? What would be the pros and cons for a man using a women's saddle?
> Some men do prefer to use the S model, though among other reasons we would recommend that for most men the saddle is simply not long enough for comfort.
4 of 4 people found this useful
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